Archive for July, 2011

Some helpful tips for Fedora Core 15

Posted: July 21, 2011 in Linux

1) How to add minimize and maximize buttons.

  • Run dconf-editor
  • Go to: desktop -> gnome-> shell- > windows
  • From your right side options double click on “buttons_layouts”. Erase it’s current text (which should be = :close ) and enter the below code instead:
:minimize,maximize,close

Source for this tip.

2) Adding “Shutdown/Power Off” and “Restart/Reboot” options into the menu.

The strange thing about GNOME 3 or Fedora Core 15, there is no “Shutdown” or “Power Off” and”Restart” options in the menu. It only provides “Suspend”.  Don’t ask me why, I am not even sure this is decided by GNOME 3 developers or the Fedora Core developers.

However, there is a way to add the options back. Just run the following command at the command prompt in root:

$> yum install -y gnome-shell-extensions-alternative-status-menu

Source here.

3) Samsung CLX 3160 (all-in-one) Printer

Just follow the instructions from the link: foo2qpdl:a linux printer driver for QPDL protocol

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The strange thing about GNOME 3 or Fedora Core 15, there is no “Shutdown” or “Power Off” and”Restart” options in the menu. It only provides “Suspend”.  Don’t ask me why, I am not even sure this is decided by GNOME 3 developers or the Fedora Core developers.

However, there is a way to add the options back. Just run the following command at the command prompt in root:

$> yum install -y gnome-shell-extensions-alternative-status-menu

Source here.

The choice of desktop environment can influence the choice Linux distribution for one to choose from. This happened to me once, now I decided to move to Fedora Core for the same reason.

Linux desktop is indeed getting better. I still remember the good old days, where writing your own fvwmrc is the way to go. FVWM is still around, but I really enjoy a full desktop environment like GNOME.

Ubuntu decided to switch Unity desktop. I used it for couple of months, and I really don’t find that fun to use, in fact, it feels rather backward. I don’t think there is a need for me go in details of why I don’t like it, there are already a lot of debates on this issue one can find them from Google search. However, I do like to echo certain “features” of Unity which, I notice, others have voiced their dissatisfaction…

First, one major turn off to me is the way how I need to find a specific application. In the old days, the applications are all arrange in a logical and easily find manner from the GNOME Application menu, but I would need to jump a few steps in order to find it now in Unity. For example, if I need to find Firefox, I just click Application Menu->Internet->Firefox, now I would need to go “Launcher”, either “Search Applications” directly or I need to find “Internet” category from “All Applications”, and may need to click “view more” if not shown immediately. I can always add application into the panel, but you can’t be expecting me to add every application into it. There should be a more logical and efficient way for me to find the application. GNOME 3 did it better, Click on Activities, it shows me “Windows” and “Applications”. If I click “Applications”, on the right hand side, it would list all the categories available.

Second, the idea of do it similar to Mac OS global menu is not right for Linux. Yes, if every application open only 1 window and in full screen, we may get along this idea. But not all application in Linux follow this structure. Take for example GIMP, when launch, it usually would open itself with 2 or 3 windows:  The image/canvas, toolbox and layers. In order for me to navigate around various setting, I need to frequently click on different windows and move up to select the option from global menu. Things would get even more confusing, If I have multiple applications run at the same time. There are times, I get confused on which application’s menu is on the global menu. It is even more troublesome, if I use focus-follows-mouse/sloppy focus.

Looking at the Unity and GNOME 3, I can’t help notice that these 2 desktop are heading for more touch screen friendly interface. I guess, this is expected.

Anyway, I am now using Fedora Core 15 with GNOME 3. Not too bad, but I still missed the old or classic way of doing things…

Who in the right mind would use “Ctrl-Delete” combination of keys for deleting files in a file manager? Huh?

Hello!!! There is a delete key on every keyboard. It says “D-E-L-E-T-E”, it means delete, why on earth I need to use another key to delete?

From one of those weird things about Gnome 3…

Thank goodness there is a work around to this “feature”:

  1. Run dconf-editor, and open: org -> gnome -> desktop -> interface
  2. Enable “can-change-accels”.
  3. Open nautilus, select any file/directory, then click “Edit” from menubar, and hover on “Move to Trash” menuitem.
  4. While hovering, click on your delete key. The accel should change from “cntrl+del” to “del”.

NOTE:

  • Make sure you have selected a file, else the “Move to Trash” menuitem will be greyed out.
  • Do remember to disable “can-change-accels” afterwards, so won’t accidental change it.
  • If dconf-editor is not install, just install it by running yum install dconf-editor

On why this “feature” is there in Gnome3, just follow the link below:
http://gilest.ro/2011/patches-for-nautilus-move-to-trash-bug

EDIT: After reading the link above and trying out my girlfriend MacBook Air, I decide to give this new feature a try. I had set  it back to Ctrl-Delete.